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Mars "Inca City"

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Mars "Inca City"

Post  Admin on Tue Apr 05, 2011 11:17 pm

Mars Global Surveyor
Mars Orbiter Camera

"Inca City" is the informal name given by Mariner 9 scientists in 1972 to a set of intersecting, rectilinear ridges that are located among the layered materials of the south polar region of Mars. Their origin has never been understood; most investigators thought they might be sand dunes, either modern dunes or, more likely, dunes that were buried, hardened, then exhumed. Others considered them to be dikes formed by injection of molten rock (magma) or soft sediment into subsurface cracks that subsequently hardened and then were exposed at the surface by wind erosion.

The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) has provided new information about the "Inca City" ridges, though the camera's images still do not solve the mystery. The new information comes in the form of a MOC red wide angle context frame taken in mid-southern spring, shown above left and above right. The original Mariner 9 view of the ridges is seen at the center. The MOC image shows that the "Inca City" ridges, located at 82°S, 67°W, are part of a larger circular structure that is about 86 km (53 mi) across. It is possible that this pattern reflects an origin related to an ancient, eroded meteor impact crater that was filled-in, buried, then partially exhumed. In this case, the ridges might be the remains of filled-in fractures in the bedrock into which the crater formed, or filled-in cracks within the material that filled the crater. Or both explanations could be wrong. While the new MOC image shows that "Inca City" has a larger context as part of a circular form, it does not reveal the exact origin of these striking and unusual martian landforms.

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/8_2002_releases/incacity/



MOC image E09-00186

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/8_2002_releases/incacity/E09-00186_annot1.gif


Mariner 9 image DAS 8044333

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/8_2002_releases/incacity/das8044333sub.gif


MOC image E09-00186

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/8_2002_releases/incacity/E09-00186_annot2.gif
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Re: Mars "Inca City"

Post  Admin on Tue Apr 05, 2011 11:20 pm

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Re: Mars "Inca City"

Post  Admin on Tue Apr 05, 2011 11:27 pm

Mars Global Surveyor
Mars Orbiter Camera
Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) High Resolution Images:
Rectilinear Ridges In South Polar Layered Terrain ("Inca City")

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/science_paper/f5/


Portion of Viking Orbiter 2 image 421B64

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/science_paper/f5/fig5_cntxA.gif



Highest-resolution pre-Mars Global Surveyor view

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/science_paper/f5/fig5_cntxB.gif



Subframe of MOC image 7908 reproduced at full resolution

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/science_paper/f5/fig5_7908.gif

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Re: Mars "Inca City"

Post  Admin on Tue Apr 05, 2011 11:31 pm

Early Views of the Martian Surface from the Mars Orbiter Camera of Mars Global Surveyor


Layering in the upper crust of Mars. MOC NA images acquired at 5 to 10 m/pixel resolution (and extending from about 40° to 90°W longitude) show that layering is ubiquitous within the walls of Valles Marineris. Layering is seen, where bedrock is exposed throughout the entire depth of the canyon, in places several kilometers below the plateau surface (Fig. 4A). The dominant morphology of the chasma walls consists of steep spurs and gullies (17); at all locations imaged at better than 10 m/pixel by MOC, the spurs consist of layers varying from a few meters to 50 m in thickness.





Figure 3

. (A) Dunes in etch pits and troughs in Crommelin crater in the Oxia Palus area (frame 3001; ∼5 m/pixel; 3.2 x 3.5 km area centered near 4.1°N, 5.3°W); (B) Rare tear-shaped dark dunes (frame 10004; ∼10 m/pixel; 6.4 x 7.0 km area centered near 47° S, 341° W).

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/279/5357/1681.full






Inca City Region and Monitoring of Araneiform Evolutions
http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/ESP_011491_0985

Inca City and Monitoring of Spider Evolutions
http://www.uahirise.org/PSP_003928_0815




Mars Image Explorer
http://viewer.mars.asu.edu/planetview/inst/ctx/P07_003928_0816_XI_81S064W#start
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